January 2023 – Ransomware Fallout – Firms That Pay Ransom Often Hit Again


A new report found that one-third of companies who are hit with ransomware and pay the hackers to unlock their systems, are often likely to be targeted a second time.

And after they pay, they are often faced with significant consequences, including system rebuilding costs, their data still being leaked and financial consequences, according to the “2022 Cyber Readiness Report” by Hiscox. The eye-opening results of the study come as the number of businesses hit by cyber attacks continues growing.

Considering the potential damage to your organization if your systems are compromised in the aftermath of a ransomware attack, even if you have cyber insurance to pay recovery costs, it’s best to take steps to thwart attacks in the first place.

More than ransom

It’s clear that paying a ransom often doesn’t mean the recovery for an affected business will be smooth, according to the report, which covers the poll results of 5,000 organizations.

The risk

Nearly half (47%) of firms reported that they had been hit by a cyber attack during the past 12 months, up from 40% in 2021. Of those who were attacked, 17% were ransomware victims.
The median cost of an attack has risen 29% to just under $17,000.
Small firms can no longer expect to fly under the radar as the criminals increasingly have them in their sights.

 

What you can do

Some firms have little exposure to a cyber attack, particularly if they don’t handle customer data or are not techdriven operations. Each firm has a different exposure level.
For companies that have cyber exposure, protecting their organization requires a multi-pronged approach that includes cyber insurance and strong data security protocols.
Cyber insurance may cover the cost of a paid ransom as well as recovery and rebuilding costs. If your organization has exposure, please give us a call to review your risk and see if cyber insurance is right for your business.

Besides that, Hiscox recommends taking a number of steps to protect against an attack and be able to recover from one faster:

  1. Keep all of your software up to date to include the installation of all the latest security patches.
  2. Frequently back up your data on a server that is not hooked up to the cloud.
  3. Train workers on how to recognize and avoid common social engineering attacks that criminals use to trick them into revealing sensitive information about themselves or their company.
  4. Teach your staff how to detect potentially dangerous e-mails that try to get them to click on a malicious link that can unleash ransomware or other malware.

January 2023 – Construction Prep – Preparing for Surety Bond Underwriter Queries


If you’ve been involved in a large construction project, you are familiar with surety bonds and all of the underwriter’s questions you need to answer. If you’re new to the game, it can be daunting.

Many small contractors pass on bidding for projects if they require a surety bond. But it doesn’t have to be that way as long as you are prepared and know what kind of questions the surety insurer’s underwriter will be asking.

Surety bonds protect project owners from loss if the contractor’s work is defective or of poor quality, or if the contractor fails to complete the work or follow the terms and conditions in the agreement.

For example, if the contractor fails to finish a project due to a shortage of workers or financial problems, the surety company has to step in and perform in the contractor’s place. Obviously, it’s in the carrier’s best interest to insure projects where they won’t be asked to perform. As a result, the questioning can feel like an inquisition, but it’s worth it to be prepared so that the insurer underwrites the bond and you can get to work.

Other areas of scrutiny

Besides the questions in the box, the insurer will also likely want to know:

  • If the start and completion dates in the contract are feasible.
  • The amount of the bid bond if there is one.
  • Any warranty terms and if they are sensible.
  • The payment terms and if they will allow the owner to manage expenses during the life of the project.
  • If there is any retainage, or the withholding of the final contract payment for a specific time period to ensure that the job has been properly completed.
  • If there are any damages that are set out in the contract in case of non-performance or shoddy workmanship.
  • If the contractor’s costs to complete other projects it is working on are sufficient to ensure that it can cover its general and administrative costs in the following year.

The above list is not exhaustive and some surety insurers may have different areas of interest.

The bottom line is you’ll want to make sure your finances are up to snuff and that you have a strong track record.


January 2023 – Top 10 California Laws, Regs for 2023


A slew of new laws and regulations that will affect California businesses are taking effect for 2023.

Last year was a busy one, with ground-breaking new laws on employee pay disclosures, a law prohibiting discrimination against cannabis-using employees and another expanding the circumstances when employees can take leave to care for a loved one. The following are the top 10 laws and regulations that employers in the Golden State need to stay on top of.

1.  Pay disclosure

This sweeping law in part requires more disclosure of pay information by employers. Under current law, employers are required to provide the pay scale for a position upon reasonable request by a job applicant. SB 1162 goes a step further by:

  • Requiring employers, upon request by a current employee, to provide the pay scale of the position they are employed in.
  • Requiring employers with 15 or more workers to include pay scale in any job postings for open positions.
  • Requiring employers to maintain records of job titles and wage rate history for each employee while employed for the company, as well as three years after their employment ceases.

Note: The law defines “pay scale” as the salary or hourly wage range that the employer “reasonably expects” to pay for the position. Penalties range from $100 to $10,000 per violation. This law took effect Jan. 1, 2023.

 

 2.  State of emergency and staff

This new law, SB 1044, bars an employer, in the event of a state of emergency or emergency condition, from taking or threatening adverse action against workers who refuse to report to, or leave, a workplace because they feel unsafe. “Emergency condition” is defined as:

  • Conditions of disaster or extreme peril to the safety of persons or property caused by natural forces or a criminal act.
  • An order to evacuate a workplace, worksite or worker’s home, or the school of a worker’s child due to a natural disaster or a criminal act.

SB 1044 also bars employers from preventing employees from using their mobile phones to seek emergency assistance, assess the safety of the situation or communicate with another person to confirm their safety. The law, which took effect Jan. 1, 2023, does not cover first responders and health care workers.

 

3. Cannabis use and discrimination

This law bars employers from discriminating in hiring, termination or other conditions of employment based on employees using cannabis while off duty. The bill’s author says the legislation is necessary because THC (tetrahydrocannabinol), the active ingredient in marijuana, can stay in a person’s system after they are no longer impaired. As a result, drug testing may detect THC in an employee’s system even if they used it weeks earlier and it is having no effect on their job performance. AB 2188 does not require employers to permit employees to be high while working. The bill would exempt construction trade employees and would not preempt state or federal laws that require employees to submit to drug testing. This law takes effect Jan. 1, 2024.

4.  Leaves of absence

The California Family Rights Act and the state’s paid sick leave law allow employees to take leave to care for a family member, defined as a spouse, registered domestic partner, child, parent, parent-in-law, grandparent, grandchild or sibling. The definition has been expanded to include “any individual related by blood or whose association with the employee is equivalent of a family relationship.”

5.  Contractor workers’ comp

Starting July 1, the following contractors must carry workers’ compensation coverage regardless of if they have employees or not:

  • Concrete (C-8 license)
  • Heating and air conditioning (C-20)
  • Asbestos abatement (C-22), and
  • Tree service (D-49).

Starting Jan. 1, 2026, all licensed contractors must have coverage.

6.  OSHA citation postings

Under current law, employers that receive citations and orders from OSHA are required to post them in or near the place the violation occurred, in order to warn employees about a potential hazard. Starting Jan. 1, 2023, they must post the notice not only in English, but also: Spanish, Chinese (Cantonese, Mandarin), Vietnamese, Tagalog, Korean, Armenian and Punjabi.

7.  Permanent COVID standard

Cal/OSHA has a permanent COVID-19 prevention standard that will sunset in 2024. The new standard, which replaces the temporary emergency standard the agency had implemented, should provide more certainty for prevention procedures and practices. Here are the main takeaways:

  • Employers are no longer required to pay employees while they are excluded from work due to COVID-19, or to screen employees daily.
  • Employers must still notify and provide paid testing to employees who had a close contact in the workplace.
  • Employers can now incorporate written COVID-19 procedures into their Injury and Illness Prevention Programs.

8.  CalSavers expanded

SB 1126 requires any person or entity with at least one employee to either provide them with access to a retirement program like a 401(k) plan or enroll them in the state-run CalSavers program. Prior to this new law only companies with five or more employees that do not offer a retirement plan are required to enroll their workers in CalSavers.

9.  Bereavement leave

Employers with five or more workers are required to provide up to five days of bereavement leave upon the death of a family member, under a new law starting in 2023. This leave may be unpaid, but the law allows workers to use existing paid leave available to them, such as accrued vacation days, paid time off or sick leave. Employers are authorized to require documentation to support the request for leave.

10.  PFL wage replacement

This law was passed last year but does not take effect until 2025. Existing California law allows employees to apply for Paid Family Leave and State Disability Insurance, both of which provide partial wage replacement benefits when employees take time off work for various reasons under the California Family Rights Act. Starting in 2025, low-wage earners (those who earn up to 70% of the state average quarterly wage) will be eligible for a higher percentage of their regular wages under the state’s PFL and SDI benefit programs.


October 2022 – Commercial Property Insurance – Coverage Gets Scarce in At-Risk Areas


AS WILDFIRES grow in number, intensity and scope, the cost of paying for the resulting claims is causing a property insurance crisis in some parts of the state that shows no sign of disappearing anytime soon.
Commercial property insurance rates have skyrocketed for businesses in areas exposed to wildfire risks. Many have received non-renewal notices and have had to secure coverage with the market of last resort, the California FAIR Plan. Here’s what’s going on and what your options are if your commercial property policy is non-renewed.

What insurers are doing

While rates are increasing nominally in most of California’s larger cities due to higher construction costs, it’s a different story in smaller cities and towns.
Insurers are responding. Some are pulling out of the state or ceasing to write policies in areas they deem high risk and are issuing non-renewal notices. Those that continue to write business in high-risk areas are taking steps to rein in their risk:
Increasing rates – Many carriers have more than doubled rates for at-risk properties.
Hiking deductibles – Many carriers are raising deductibles in wildfire-prone areas.
Stricter terms – Some insurers are limiting the amount they will pay out if a building is destroyed. That can sometimes be as low as 20% of the value, meaning the rest would have to be covered out of pocket by the property owner.

Protective measures insurers may require

Defensible space: Maintain a defensible space around your building, usually all the way to the property line. You can find a thorough description of how to create a defensible space here.
Non-combustible materials and other measures: Use only non-combustible building materials, such as fire-proof shingles for your roof. The insurer may require you to shore up roofs, gutters, vents and siding and ensure there are no gaps that would allow embers to penetrate.
They may require exterior wall cladding made of non-combustible siding materials.
Reliable water supply: Insurers are requiring property owners to have clear access to a reliable water supply, including proximity to public hydrants and the possible installation of private-site yard hydrants. The availability of a reliable water supply is critical and should be evaluated frequently.
You may also consider installing a back-up water supply, such as a fire pump and tank.
Routine clearing: Insurers are requiring property owners to have a routine property clearing regimen that includes regularly removing dried vegetation from the property and removing debris or other flammable materials. Debris and vegetation are the tinder for large fires.

Your options if canceled

If you’ve been cancelled by your insurer, we can mount a search for replacement coverage. If all California licensed insurers that we have access to
reject your policy, we have two choices:
The non-admitted market – These are insurers that are not licensed in the state of California, but they are viable insurance companies nonetheless. They can offer policies that may not cover everything a homeowner’s policy from an admitted insurer would have. Policies can often be customized for the insured.

California FAIR Plan – We can only go to the FAIR Plan if you’ve thoroughly exhausted the options available through the voluntary market and been denied coverage.
If only one admitted insurance company is willing to write your policy, no matter how steep the premium is, you cannot go to the FAIR Plan for coverage.
Not only are FAIR Plans more expensive, but they offer fewer coverage options and lower policy limits. That said, the limits have doubled in 2022 to $6.8 million per policy.


July 2022 – Privacy Liability – Companies Bleed Data as Workers Move It Offsite


THE MORE employees are working from home, the greater the risk that their employers’ sensitive data is also being stored on their poorly secured devices and laptops.
A new study by Symantec Corp. found many workers are sharing, moving, and exposing sensitive company data as part of carrying out the requirements of their jobs, and they may not realize they could be compromising the information or that what they are doing is wrong.
More worrisome, the study found that half of all employees surveyed who left or lost their jobs in the prior 12 months had kept confidential company data. When that happens, the departing worker, your company, and the new employer are all put at risk.

 

 

 

 

Worse still, the majority of employees put these files at further risk because they don’t take steps to delete the data after transferring it. “In most cases, the employee is not a malicious insider,” writes Symantec, “but merely negligent or careless about securing IP. However, the consequences remain. The IP theft occurs when an employee takes any confidential information from a former employer.”

 

 

 

 

 

What you can do

Symantec suggests attacking the problem from multiple angles:
• Educate employees – You should take steps to ensure that IP migration and theft awareness is a regular and integral part of security-awareness training. Create and enforce policies dictating how they can and cannot use company data in the workplace and when working remotely. Help employees understand that sensitive information should remain on corporate-owned devices and databases. Also, new employees must be told that they are not to bring data from a former employer to your company.

• Enforce non-disclosure agreements – If you have not done so already, you need to craft new employment agreements to ensure they include specific language on company data.
They should include language that the employee is responsible for safeguarding sensitive and confidential information (and define what that is).
For employees that are leaving your employ, conduct focused conversations during exit interviews and make sure they review the original IP agreement.
Include and describe, in checklist form, descriptions of data that may and may not transfer with a departing employee.

• Track your data – You need to know where your data is going and how you can find out by using monitoring technology. One option is to install data-loss-prevention software that notifies managers and employees in real-time when sensitive information is inappropriately sent, copied, or otherwise improperly exposed.
Also, introduce a data protection policy that monitors inappropriate access or use of company data and notifies the employee and you of violations.
This increases security awareness and deters theft. When you know how data is leaving your company, you can then take steps to prevent it from seeping out.


April 2022 – Risk Management – Don’t Let a Subcontractor Derail Your Safety Efforts


ONE OF the biggest challenges construction businesses face is preventing subcontractors’ and suppliers’ poor or non-existent safety practices from denting their own safety program.
While you may consider a number of factors when vetting a new subcontractor or vendor, one area that is often overlooked is their workplace safety practices.
This mistake can cost you dearly if one of their workers causes an incident at your worksite. In addition to an injury to one of your own employees, you could get a visit from an Occupational Safety and Health Administration inspector.

The National Safety Council’s Campbell Institute recently conducted a study of organizations with excellent safety records to identify the best practices for subcontractor and vendor safety.

As part of the study it identified five steps during a contractor or vendor relationship when it’s incumbent on a hiring company to evaluate the workplace safety habits of their business partners.

Prequalification

The institute recommends looking at more than just a company’s experience modifi cation rate. It says safety-minded fi rms assess subcontractors in multiple areas, such as their total recordable incident rate, fatality rate, days away from work for injured workers, restricted or transferred rate, and other OSHA recordables for the last three years.

Many firms also ask for environmental reports, written safety programs, permits, licenses, and continuous improvement programs.

Pre-job task and risk assessment

Before a subcontractor begins work, institute members recommend having a method for evaluating the risk of the work that is to be performed. Doing this can help you understand the scope of the work and give you a chance to put into place a new written safety program if the risk is deemed high.
Most importantly, subcontractors should be required to adhere to the same safety standards as your company.

Training and orientation

You should require safety orientation and skills training for subcontractors before they step onto your jobsite. Also, if they are doing highly specifi c work, you should ensure they have any required permits or special training. Some of the jobs that fit into that category are confi ned-space entry, electrical work, hot work, energy control, forklifts, and elevated work.

Job monitoring

Many safety-minded companies monitor work with daily checklists, pre-shift tailgate or safety meetings and weekly walkthrough inspections. Some of the companies surveyed for the study also require contract employees to submit a certain amount of safety observations and utilize mobile applications to report non-compliance or unsafe conditions. Also, you need to keep up-to-date incident logs, as this is crucial to monitoring subcontractor safety during a project.

Post-job evaluation

Conduct a post-job evaluation. During this phase look at safety, customer service and the quality of the fi nished work, and use those factors in determining the subcontractor’s eligibility for future contracts.


October 2021 – CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY – Building Risks Evolve, Creating Unique Challenges


AS THE CONSTRUCTION industry booms, contractors face evolving risks that, left unchecked, can leave their operation exposed to new liabilities.
If you already operate a construction firm, you know that there is a labor shortage that has made it difficult to find experienced workers and that hiring entities are asking builders to take on more of the design function, as well.
Your liability picture has also likely changed with the increasing use of wrap-ups and, if you’re using technology in your operation, you now have rising cyber-security risks, too.

Lack of qualified workers

The bottom fell out of the construction industry in the U.S. during the first few months of the COVID-19 pandemic, and many worksites were idled. Now that the industry has found its footing, it’s been dealing with a severe labor shortage.
As construction firms struggle to find workers, the ones who are on the job are having to take on larger workloads, which can put them at risk of injury or making mistakes.
Also, many contractors are having to take on younger, less-seasoned laborers, who may lack the experience to identify and avoid hazards, which puts them and others at risk of injury. Those injuries in turn affect your workers’ comp
premiums.
A lack of workers coupled with inexperienced new ones on sites can also end up drawing out projects, forcing contractors to miss deadlines.

Professional liability risks

As more project owners want an all-in-one job with the lead contractor designing and building the project, contractors now face a new type of risk: professional liability.

But the typical contractor’s insurance policy doesn’t provide protection for any design work you take on.
Courts have ruled that:

  • Designers who perform “builder activities” lose limitation of liability typically enjoyed by design professionals.
  • Builders who perform “design activities” assume responsibility for design deficiencies.

Wrap-ups more prevalent

Many construction projects are now covered under one general liability policy to cover the work of the general contractor, as well as of all the subs. More lenders are requiring that liability is set up in one all-encompassing policy.
A properly assembled general liability wrap-up should provide coverage not only during the construction period, but also up to 10 years after the work is completed.  These policies often reduce the cost of coverage.

More cyber-security risks

Like all industries, the construction sector has grown increasingly reliant on technology to get the job done. That exposes contractors to a variety of cyber risks, including keeping project designs, client records and employee records confidential.
Many building contracts today include clauses requiring the contractor to be responsible for potential cyber breaches.
Given the increasing popularity of practices such as “building information modeling,” “integrated project delivery,” and file-sharing between participants in a construction project, contractors may be at increased risk of liability in the event of a data breach.


April 2021 – Risk Management – Supply Chain Disruption Lessons from Pandemic


BESIDES THE health and economic devastation that the COVID-19 pandemic has left in its wake, it has also caused supply chain disruptions that have affected a number of industries.

The fallout for companies of all types illustrates the fragility of most businesses’ supply chains. The pandemic has left retailers with half-empty shelf space because product manufacturers couldn’t keep operations going due to raw material or personnel shortages, while a number of carmakers and other manufacturers have had to suspend operations because of a global semiconductor shortage.

But it’s not only large companies that suffer, and small businesses are especially vulnerable. That’s why it’s important that you have in place a solid plan for averting and dealing with disruptions to your supply chain if you rely on materials and inputs from outside vendors.

Here’s what you can do to manage this growing risk.

Understand your supply chain

Start by identifying risks in your supply chain and develop ways to mitigate them.

FOUR MAIN EXTERNAL SUPPLY CHAIN RISKS

  • Flow interruptions – Problems with the movement of goods and materials.
  • Environmental risks – Economic, social, political, terrorism threat and weather-related factors that affect facilities and infrastructure. The pandemic falls into this category.
  • Business risks – Problems caused by factors like a supplier’s poor financial or general stability, or the purchase or sale of supplier companies by other entities.
  • Physical plant risks – Problems at a supplier’s facility. For example, a key supplier could have a machinery breakdown and/or regulators may shut the facility down.

 

Develop a plan

The best way to manage a supply chain disruption is to prepare for it. Start by undertaking a business impact analysis to prepare your company.

Form a team of key personnel to:

  • Identify alternatives to key suppliers. One option is to contract with an alternative vendor in advance, so you can certify them and ensure they can ramp up if you lose a critical supplier.
  • Model the impact of disruptions on your production and inventory for the four supply chain risks listed to the left. Think about how non-delivery of a key item
    would affect your operations.

Using that information, you can build contingencies for supply chain failures:

  • Plan for how you would respond to all “what if” scenarios that could affect your operations. Be realistic about assessing your capacity to respond to these scenarios.
  • Create a contingency plan for failure of any supply chain pillars. Identify the points at which you would need to execute risk-mitigating measures, like sourcing from other vendors or using new distribution channels.
  • In advance, amass a contingency management team that will bridge the divide between your departments during disruptions. This team must include senior
    staff who are influential with top company decision-makers.
  • Make sure your supply chain is flexible enough to deal with risks. Look at opportunities to address current supply chain bottlenecks; investigate alternative transportation network configurations or production systems.

 

The final backstop: insurance

You can address supply chain risks with business interruption insurance or contingent business interruption insurance.

Business interruption insurance.
This coverage, which is often included in a commercial property policy, covers lost profits after a company’s own facility is damaged by an insured peril.

Contingent business interruption insurance. This is often a policy rider that you can purchase. It covers lost profits if an insured peril shuts down a critical supplier, part of the transportation or distribution chain, or a major customer.

This coverage is triggered if there is:
1. Damage to property that prevents one of your suppliers from making products or delivering them.
2. Damage to property that prevents your customers from receiving your products.


April 2021- Cyber Insurance – As Attacks and Costs Mount, Rates Climb Higher


CYBER INSURANCE rates are going to increase dramatically in 2021, driven by more frequent and more severe insured losses, according to a recent industry study.

The report by global insurance firm Aon plc predicted that rates would jump by 20% to 50% this year due to two main factors:

 

1. Cyber attacks are becoming more frequent

While publicly disclosed data breach/privacy incidents are actually occurring less often, ransomware attacks are exploding in frequency.

Ransomware incident rates rose 486% from the first quarter of 2018 to the fourth quarter of 2020. The comparable rate for data breach incidents fell 57% during the same period. The incident rates for the two types of events combined rose 300% over the trailing two years.

 

2. The costs of these attacks are growing

The average dollar loss increased in every quarter of 2020. Ransomware attacks were particularly severe – many of them resulted in eight-figure losses. Others may grow to that level as business interruption losses are adjusted and lawsuits against insured organizations proceed.

The combination of more frequent and more costly losses is a
recipe for higher rates.

Cyber insurance rates continued increasing in 2020, with rises of between 6% and 16% in the last four months of the year. In January 2021, most of the top 12 cyber insurance companies told Aon they were planning more drastic rate hikes. Nearly 60% reported that they would be seeking rate increases of 30% or more during the second quarter. None of them expected increases less than 10%.

 

New underwriting criteria

When insurers evaluate cyber insurance applicants, they will be particularly concerned with the organization’s overall cyber risk profile, its cyber governance and access control practices, and its network and data security. Prior loss history will be less important because the frequency of attacks is growing so quickly.

Some insurers may also cap how much they will pay for ransomware losses, or even exclude them entirely. They may also increase the waiting periods before coverage begins to apply.

 

WHAT BUSINESSES CAN DO

To improve your chances of getting more favorable pricing and coverage, the report recommends that you focus on:

  • Reducing the risk of cyber losses.
  • Measures to keep data private.
  • Building an internal culture of cybersecurity.
  • Preparing for ransomware attacks and disaster recovery planning.
  • How your contracts and insurance will respond to a supply chain security breach.
  • Understanding primary and excess coverage terms and
    communicating primary terms to excess insurers.

CARES ACT – New Law Helps Coronavirus-hit Employers, Workers – April 2020


THE $2 TRILLION Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act stimulus law has a number of provisions that employers and their workers need to know about and can take advantage of during this crisis.

The CARES Act aims to help workers and employers weather the outbreak by:
• Extending unemployment benefits.
• Requiring health plans to cover COVID-19-related costs.
• Providing Small Business Administration (SBA) emergency loans.
• Providing emergency loans for mid-sized and large companies.

Parts of the CARES Act will likely benefit your organization and employees in some way. Here’s what you need to know:

Extended unemployment

The CARES Act extends unemployment insurance benefits to workers, as long as they lost their jobs due to the outbreak.
Unemployment benefits under the CARES Act also apply to furloughed employees.
Workers in California will be able to collect both state unemployment and federal unemployment through the new law.
Under existing state law, workers who have lost their jobs can already receive regular unemployment benefits of between $40 and $450 per week, depending on their highest-earning quarter in a 12-month period beginning and ending before they apply for benefits with the state Employment Development Department. These benefits can last for up to 26 weeks.
The Pandemic Emergency Compensation program funded by the new law will provide an additional $600 per week on top of state unemployment benefits, through July 31.
The law extends state-level unemployment by an additional 13 weeks. For example, whereas most of California’s unemployment benefits last 26 weeks, the bill extends state benefits to 39 weeks.
The extended benefits will last through Dec. 31.

Health plan changes

Under the CARES Act, employer-sponsored group health plans must provide for covered workers – without cost-sharing or out-of-pocket expenses – the cost of COVID-19 testing, treatment and vaccinations when and if they become available.

SBA loans

In response to the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, small business owners are eligible to apply for an Economic Injury Disaster Loan advance of up to $10,000.
This advance will provide economic relief to businesses that are currently experiencing a temporary loss of revenue. Funds will be made available following a successful application. This loan advance will not have to be repaid.
This program is for any small business with fewer than 500 employees (including sole proprietorships, independent contractors and self-employed persons) as well as private non-profit organizations affected by COVID-19. You can find more information here.

And the law’s Paycheck Protection Program offers 1% interest loans to businesses with fewer than 500 workers. Borrowers who don’t lay off workers in the next eight weeks will have their loans forgiven, along with the interest. These loans are designed to provide a direct incentive for small businesses to keep their workers on the payroll. If small businesses maintain payroll through this economic crisis, some of the borrowed money via the PPP can be forgiven – the funds will be available through June 30. Act fast.

Mid-sized employers

Under the new law, the Secretary of the Treasury is authorized to implement financial assistance programs that specifically target mid-size employers with between 500 and 10,000 employees.
Loans would not have an annualized interest rate higher than 2% and principal and interest would not be due and payable for at least six months after the loan is made. But unlike loans under the PPP, these are not forgivable.


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