Double Down on Safety This New Year – January 2020 RISK REPORT


As the new year gets underway, now would be a good time to double down on your workplace safety efforts to see if there are any areas that you may be overlooking.
While your safety regimen may be top-notch, there is always room for improvement and you can consider these options as recommended by EHS Today:

Use a 10-second rule

Workers should consider using the 10-second rule before resuming a task after a break or disruption. During this time before resumption, the worker can conduct a mental hazard check, which EHS Today refers to as STEP:
S – Stop before resuming a job or beginning a new task.
T – Think about the task you are about to do.
E – Ensure potential hazards have been identified and mitigated.
P – Perform the job.

Take advantage of OSHA training

The OSHA Outreach Training Program provides training for workers and employers on the recognition, avoidance, abatement and prevention of safety and health hazards in workplaces. Through this program, workers can attend 10-hour or 30-hour classes delivered by OSHA-authorized trainers. The 10-hour class is intended for entry-level workers, while the 30-hour class is more appropriate for workers with some safety responsibility. Information is on OSHA’s website. Communicate with non-English-speaking workers Non-English-speaking laborers have more workplace accidents than their peers. The language barrier may keep them from reporting workplace hazards and they may not understand safety instructions.

If you have non-English-speaking workers:
• Ensure that training is fully understood.
• Try to get any safety training materials also printed up in Spanish, and other languages prevalent in your workplace.
• If you have one, provide them a contact in your organization that speaks their language, so that they can get answers to any questions they may have or to report concerns.

Urge employees to speak up

Let your workers know that there will be no retribution for reporting perceived workplace hazards, no matter how minor. You can also implement the third suggestion above, and reward employees that point out safety issues.

Make your training engaging

The best safety training programs are those that employees remember. Some good ways to make sure the information is retained include using real-life examples, story-telling, skits and strong video presentations.

Do more than OSHA requires

OSHA’s regulations are meant to be comprehensive, but every workplace is different and for a truly effective safety program you should fine-tune your safety requirements specifically for your workplace. In other words, you can go a step beyond what OSHA requires.

Watch each other’s back

You should also instill a sense of responsibility among your staff to look out for each other. If a worker sees another performing a job in an unsafe manner, they should step in to offer assistance. This can be done without being intrusive or confrontational.
Some good approaches include: “Hey, would you like me to watch out for your safety?” and “As you know, you need to be wearing cut-resistant gloves to perform that task.”